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New Pa. congressional map now on Governor Wolf's desk for review

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The Supreme Court won't save Pennsylvania's congressional map

Gov. Wolf's office released this statement on the map submitted Friday.

The state Senate last week passed legislation that would serve as a vehicle into which map language can be inserted if an agreement can be reached, Corman said.

Asked which districts might see the biggest changes in competitiveness, he named the Fifteenth and Seventh, now held by Republicans Charlie Dent and Pat Meehan, neither of whom is running for reelection. For instance, in Pennsylvania, there are one million more Democrats than Republicans, according to the Pennsylvania Department of State.

The new map would have the infamous 7th Congressional district cut a swath through parts of Montgomery, Chester, and Delaware Counties on a generally northeast to southwest axis.

Beyond indicating that the court is ready to approve its own maps, the order is silent on how the situation should be resolved if the Legislature creates new maps that the governor refuses to endorse, Yaw said.

First, partisan gerrymandering is like cancer: Sometimes the signs are obvious, but sometimes no signs can be seen.

"An election corrupted by extensive, sophisticated gerrymandering and partisan dilution of votes is not 'free and equal, '" wrote Justice Debra McCloskey Todd. But Republican leaders have been busy trying to avoid complying with the Court's order. But it's worth noting that the Republicans' appeal to the Supreme Court was rooted in the idea that this was a state matter.

"Gerrymandering is where one political party does that - draws the lines basically - to try and give their party an advantage in the elections".

Second, the court will need to ask whether it is looking for a "neutral" plan or a "fair" plan.

"It's decent map. It's good".

February 9th, 2018, state republican leaders delivered on deadline their plan for what could become a new congressional map for Pennsylvania.

Redrawing Congressional maps in two weeks does not seem to promote fairness to all parties involved. Congressional districts determine who gets to represent Pennsylvania in Washington D.C.

The Republican plea for help at the Supreme Court faced quite long odds. The lawsuit contended that this was deliberate, an attempt by Republicans to pack as many Democratic voters as possible into the smallest number of districts, ensuring large numbers of "wasted" votes in each.

That advantage has been despite the fact that Democrats outnumber Republicans in Pennsylvania.

The Wolf administration said later Friday that it's working on a comprehensive overhaul of Pennsylvania's election apparatus, including its voter registration database. The map includes a district in the Philadelphia suburbs that has been described as resembling Goofy kicking Donald Duck. A "fair" plan probably would not. So the plaintiffs went to state court to make their case. Rather, treatment must provide an "equal opportunity to participate in the political process and to elect candidates of choice".

Unfortunately, Pennsylvania isn't the only state where the Republican Party is coming after judges that have ruled against them. It will be used for the May 15 primary, but not for the March 13 special election to fill a vacant congressional seat in southwestern Pennsylvania. The state court decision was upheld at the federal level.

Bernard Grofman is the Jack W. Peltason Chair of Democracy Studies and professor of political science at the University of California at Irvine. And while the Supreme Court did not completely throw out Persily's districts, it stayed a federal court from implementing them in Wake and Mecklenburg County, apparently acceding to the GOP's claim that this is a state issue.

The revised version comes after a group of 18 Democratic voters backed by the Pa. League of Women Voters argued the maps drawn in 2011 violates Pennsylvania's Constitution.

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