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Bill Skarsgard as predator Clown Pennywise in "IT"

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'IT' director gives update on 'transdimensional' sequel

The movie is a treat for everyone - unless you're Donald Trump, who had been banned personally by Stephen King from seeing the movie. We want to be part of an enduring, well received Stephen King adaptation.

Like King's 1986 horror novel, It will be split in two, following two timelines from the late 1950s and the late 1980s.

For fans of King's sprawling but psychologically penetrating novel, the only screen adaptation has been a 1990 ABC miniseries that featured an excellent Tim Curry as Pennywise but otherwise felt constrained by the standards of network television. Unlike the miniseries, the film focuses only on the Losers' Club as children, saving the adult portion of their tale for a sequel, yet to be cast and not officially greenlit.

Set in the summer of 1988 - all BMX bikes and New Kids On The Block - it follows the attempts of the Losers' Club of seven 13-year-old misfits to defeat a killer clown called Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård). "From the first time I read the book, it was very hard for me to look at a storm drain and not think of Pennywise lurking", she smiles. "You tell him to do his happy face and you tell him to do his mean face, and that's the two faces he did in all the pictures".

"And to do that at such a young age, it's fantastic because you're star-struck but then there's also that side of you who wants to learn as much as you can which is what I tried to do with Nicole, Viggo and Hugo Weaving".

Directed by Andy Muschietti, "It" is a deeply hateful film with the pretenses of being an edgy throwback genre mashup, a la "Stranger Things". I think that it's so different that you can be a fan of both IT's without them interfering with each other. To me, it's all about character.

"Don't get me wrong, I love creepy clowns but my mind isn't just scary clowns and unsettling images". "I hope so I really liked the original but I have high expectation about this one". Or is it just a dare for the under-17 crowd, who are more likely to forgive the story flaws and just submit to the scares? "And, you know, it's really moving". "Clearly, the first time we see Pennywise is an incredibly important scene and, speaking for myself, it's something that stays with you".

Now that we've gotten one scary element out of the way, check out the trailer below to see if you'll be willing to sit through this film in the spirit of Halloween.

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