recorderjournal.com

Science

5 political takeaways following the Syria strike

Share
AP: Russia agrees to maintain hotline with US after strikes

Rep. Steny Hoyer, the Southern Maryland lawmaker and No. 2 Democrat in the House, said the US airstrikes were "not a sufficient answer on their own to the challenge posed by the civil war in Syria and the Assad regime's war crimes".

President Trump hit a Syrian airfield with dozens of Tomahawk missiles. Iran, another close ally of the Syrian government, condemned the strike, describing "unilateral action" as "dangerous". Syrians on the ground have mixed feelings about what the USA strikes might mean for their future.

Not everyone was cheering in Washington, where the president's decision to act without congressional authority angered a mix of libertarian Republicans, Democrats and the far right. The Obama administration threatened to attack Assad's forces after previous chemical attacks, but never followed through.

The missile has been a critical part of USA warfare since the Persian Gulf War in 1991 and commonly carries a 1,000-pound warhead.

Although he's hopeful the missile strikes will stop Assad from carrying out more attacks, Chaker said he would like to see the global community do more than attack an air base.

"This administration has acted recklessly without care or consideration of the dire consequences of the United States attack on Syria without waiting for the collection of evidence from the scene of the chemical poisoning", Gabbard said in her statement last night.

"In light of this, President Trump must present a coherent strategy for addressing the ongoing situation in Syria, including our own responsibility in confronting the humanitarian catastrophe and refugee crisis", she said. He also said Putin believes the strike was carried out "in violation of worldwide law" and "under an invented pretext". But a spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin warned that the strikes dealt "a significant blow" to relations between Moscow and Washington.

The US ambassador to the United Nations has said America is "prepared to do more" militarily in Syria but hopes it will not be necessary.

Over the past few months, many Western countries have been backing away from long-standing demands that Assad leave power, accepting that rebels no longer had the power to remove him by force. Trump authorized the strikes following a devastating chemical weapons attack in Idlib province.

Italy gave its support to the United States action, saying it was a suitable response to Syrian aggression and a deterrent against the use of chemical weapons by its leader.

"The whole world should save the Syrian people from the clutches of the killer Bashar [al-Assad] and his aides".

Syria rejected the accusations, and blames opposition fighters for stockpiling the chemicals.

He said the attack had succeeded in "reducing the Syrian government's ability to deliver chemical weapons" by severely damaging or destroying aircraft.

Konashenkov said Russian Federation will help Syria strengthen its air defenses to help "protect the most sensitive Syrian infrastructure facilities", the AP reported. Obviously, that did not happen "100 percent", Kattouf said.

Spokesman Sean Spicer said the missile attack sent a clear message to Assad, but he avoided explicitly calling for the Syrian to leave office. At least 27 children died in the suspected attack in Khan Sheikhun.

There was a sense of caution among others - a feeling that the strikes won't achieve much at all.

Waddah Abed Rabbo, editor-in-chief of Syria's pro-regime Al-Watan daily, said the regime had "no interest in launching a chemical attack especially just after Assad obtained got what he's wanted for six years - recognition and legitimacy from the United States". But the vote was canceled because of differences among the 15 members.

Share